Interesting about Italy

Italian holidays

Many Italian holidays are very similar to those celebrated in Europe and around the world. The best examples in this case are New Year and Christmas. However, there are a number of other festivities such as Halloween, which have been especially changed by Italians. In the country of wine and sun, a number of other holidays are presented, typical exclusively for Italy. Here are the ten most celebrated and most beloved by Italians holidays.

Carnival (Carnevale)

Carnival, also known as Mardi Grass, is being sold in other countries from around the world. In Italy, it takes place 40 days before the bright holiday of Easter. In a country where energetic and cheerful people live, the carnival is held in the same spirit: a sea of ​​colors, emotions and impressions fall upon Italy every spring. The most famous, of course, in Venice.

Immaculate Conception (Immacolata Concezione)

The celebration of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary takes place in Italy on December 8 and is considered one of the most significant holidays. A huge number of believers attend festive masses on this day.

Republic Day (Festa della Repubblica)

From year to year on June 2, Italians celebrate another anniversary when Italy became a republic, repealing the laws of the monarchy. By the way, this happened in 1946. Given the fact that the King of Italy repeatedly supported the fascist dictator Benito Mussolini during World War II, the country's population began to have a negative attitude towards the monarchy. And not surprisingly, in addition to the representatives of the "blue blood" of Italy there are other "merits".

Epifania

This holiday is celebrated every year on January 6, marking the end of the Christmas holidays. On this day, a fabulous atmosphere reigns on the Italian streets, and the kids are waiting for gifts at home from the good witch Befana, who comes to the house with gifts when the magi once came to the newborn Jesus.

Liberation Day (Festa della Liberazione)

The day of the liberation of Italy from fascism is celebrated every year on April 25th. On this day, all Italians honor the memory of the victims of the regime and the bloody Second World War.

Labor Day (Festa dei Lavoratori)

Despite the fact that many countries celebrate Labor Day on May 1, for Italians this holiday means much more than honoring the work of workers. On this day, numerous liberal political parties protest on many issues. And although Labor Day usually ends without serious incidents, it is still a politically colored holiday.

Ferragosto (Ferragosto)

Apart from the New Year, Easter and Christmas, this is perhaps the most important and most celebrated holiday in Italy. Every year on August 15, Italians celebrate the Ascension of the Virgin - the day when the Virgin Mary ascended into heaven. During the celebrations of Ferragosto, all of Italy literally freezes, and no one misses the opportunity to enjoy the amazing atmosphere in the air.

Easter (Pasqua)

The Italian version of Easter has a number of traditions and rituals. It is worth noting that Monday following Easter is a national holiday for Italians. On the eve of this holiday, Italians are carefully preparing for it, attending numerous masses and services.

New Year (Il Capodanno)

One of the largest festivals in Italy. Friends and loved ones get together at huge parties. And at midnight, the sky is painted with colorful fireworks, and Italians greet the New Year with the clink of glasses filled with prosecco or sprumante - the local version of sparkling wine.

Christmas (Natale)

Christmas holidays are celebrated from Christmas Eve up to Epiphanius, in other words, from December 24 to January 6. This time is accompanied by numerous traditions and rituals that unite the whole family.

Watch the video: Learn ALL Italian Holidays in 80 Minutes (February 2020).

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